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Tag: VCs

The Role of Assumptions in Startup Pitching

More than truthfulness of the numbers, investors evaluate the assumptions underneath a pitch. They are not asking “Are these numbers real?” but “Could they be real?”.

The assumptions reveal the logic of thinking by the founders. When examining them in detail, one should get logical answers to questions like:

  1. How many sales people are needed to hit the sales goals?
  2. How much will it cost to achieve the sales target?
  3. How much is the cost for acquiring a new customer?
  4. How long is the average sales cycle?

(Assuming an enterprise sales case; the questions in a B2C market would be different, so you need to consider the circumstances.)

The investors are looking for “intellectual rigor” and “completeness of thought” from the founders. Therefore, the pitch needs to show that you understand how to run the business, and how those actions are linked with growth within a defined timeframe. Like one investor said, it is better to be roughly right than exactly wrong.

Startup due diligence: Some considerations

We had an interesting week with the Qatar Science and Technology Park (QSTP) that had invited several high-profile entrepreneurs from the US to evaluate the technologies of Qatar Computing Research Institute (QCRI).

Unfortunately, I wasn’t able to attend all the sessions, but from what I saw I picked up a few pointers for due diligence work done by investors when evaluating the startups. Here they are:

  • customer references => who are the existing customers and what do they say?
  • investor references => who are the existing investors and what do they say?
  • competitors => feature comparison & position map
  • technology => expert evaluation
  • IPR => defensibility of the core tech
  • key competitive advantage => if not the core tech, then what is the thing preventing others from replicating your success?

Conclusion

It’s worthwhile to mention that the formal due diligence process is something different from an informal one – the latter takes place when the investor does some initial inquiries about the team and the tech, and then decides whether he wants to pursue further discussions. After reaching an adequate level of confidence, formal and detailed due diligence procedures conducted with the help of experts (e.g., tech, legal, science) ensue.