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Tag: digital marketing

How to measure offline marketing with online metrics?

Introduction

The issue with offline marketing is tracking. For many offline marketing efforts, such as exhibitions and networking events, it’s hard to track results.

Participation in these events is often expensive, and the results are evaluated on a qualitative basis. Although qualitative evaluation is better than nothing, quantitative data is obviously better. And in many cases, we can do that – all we need it the measuring mindset and a little bit of creativity.

The bottom line is: If you’re spending a lot of money into offline marketing, you have to justify its performance. Otherwise you don’t know how well the money turns into desired outcomes, let alone how well event A compared with event B in terms of performance.

The simple solution

The issue can be solved by using metrics. For example, if we are selling in a trade fair, I can use performance metrics like these:

  • sales (€, qty)
  • number of catalogs and/or flyers distributed
  • number of emails gathered via a lead-generation contest (“give us your email – win prize x”)

Of course, knowing the cost of participation, we can now calculate composite metrics such as:

  • Direct ROI = (sales – cost) / cost
  • Cost per lead (email) = cost / number of emails
  • Cost per catalogue distributed = cost / number of catalogues distributed

These can be now measured against digital channels, and evaluated whether or not we’d like to participate in the event in question again, say, next year.

Comparing offline and online performance

During my time as a marketing manager, I’ve come up with different ways to standardize the offline metrics, that is to say calculate offline marketing activities so that they are comparable with digital channels.

Here are three ways we’ve been using.

1. Cost per card

  • CPCa = cost of participation / number of business cards collected
  • Compare with: CPL

Networking is an important part of the sales cycle, especially in B2B markets. By quantifying the results, you are able to compare one event against another, as well as compare the results with lead generation (CPL) through digital channels
(for this, only include the business cards of potential customers).

2. Cost per catalog

  • CPCat = cost of distribution / number of catalogues distributed
  • Compare with: CPC

In Finland, I’ve found that catalog distribution inside magazines is a cost-effective form of marketing. This metric I compare with Google CPC, i.e. the cost of average paid user via Google. The rationale is that since the catalog is inside the customer’s favorite magazine, she will surely take a look at it (during the reading
session you tend to have more time).

3. Cost per festival contact

  • CPF = cost of participation / number of visitors
  • Compare with: CPM

Summer festivals are hot in Finland. Every year, there is more than a dozen big festivals across the country. We’re participating in some of them together with our suppliers. Festivals most often provide you with the number previous year’s visitors. I find it best to compare this metric with CPM, since the visitors are just
hypothetical contacts.

Of course, we can use several metrics, so for festivals I use CPF to evaluate which ones are the most cost-effective ones (that’s one, but the not the only criterion, since the match between us and the target audience is more important). Then, to evaluate how well we did, I’ll use the other metrics, mainly cost per lead (email) and cost per catalog distributed.

Hopefully this article gave you some useful ideas. If you have something to share, please write in in the comments. Thanks for reading.

I’m into digital marketing, startups, platforms. Download my dissertation on startup dilemmas: http://goo.gl/QRc11f

A Few Interesting Digital Analytics Problems… (And Their Solutions)

Introduction

Here’s a list of analytics problems I’ve devised for a class I was teaching a digital analytics course (Web & Mobile Analytics, Information Technology Program) at Aalto University in Helsinki. Some solutions to them are also considered.

The problems

  • Last click fallacy = taking only the last interaction into account when analayzing channel or campaign performance (a common problem for standard Google Analytics reports)
  • Analysis paralysis = the inability to know which data to analyze or where to start the analysis process from (a common problem when first facing a new analytics tool 🙂 )
  • Vanity metrics = reporting ”show off” metrics as oppose to ones that are relevant and important for business objectives (a related phenomenon is what I call “metrics fallback” in which marketers use less relevant metrics basically because they look better than the primary metrics)
  • Aggregation problem = seeing the general trend, but not understanding why it took place (this is a problem of “averages”)
  • Multichannel problem = losing track of users when they move between online and offline (in cross-channel environment, i.e. between digital channels one can track users more easily, but the multichannel problem is a major hurdle for companies interested in knowing the total impact of their campaigns in a given channel)
  • Churn problem = a special case of the aggregation problem; the aggregate numbers show growth whereas in reality we are losing customers
  • Data discrepancy problem = getting different numbers from different platforms (e.g., standard Facebook conversion configuration shows almost always different numbers than GA conversion tracking)
  • Optimization goal dilemma = optimizing for platform-specific metrics leads to suboptimal business results, and vice versa. It’s because platform metrics, such as Quality Score, are meant to optimize competitiveness within the platform, not outside it.

The solutions

  • Last click fallacy → attribution modeling, i.e. accounting for all or select interactions and dividing conversion value between them
  • Analysis paralysis → choosing actionable metrics, grounded in business goals and objectives; this makes it easier to focus instead of just looking at all of the overwhelming data
  • Vanity metrics → choosing the right KPIs (see previous) and sticking to them
  • Aggregation problem → segmenting data (e.g. channel, campaign, geography, time)
  • Multichannel problem → universal analytics (and the associated use of either client ID or customer ID, i.e. a universal connector)
  • Churn problem → cohort analysis (i.e. segment users based on the timepoint of their enrollment)
  • Data discrepancy problem → understanding definitions & limitations of measurement in different ad platforms (e.g., difference between lookback windows in FB and Google), using UTM parameters to track individual campaigns
  • Optimization goal dilemma → making a judgment call, right? Sometimes you need to compromise; not all goals can be reached simultaneously. Ultimately you want business results, but as far as platform-specific optimization helps you getting to them, there’s no problem.

Want to add something to this list? Please write in the comments!

[edit: I’m compiling a larger list of analytics problems. Will update this post once it’s ready.]

Learn more

I’m into digital marketing, startups, platforms. Download my dissertation on startup dilemmas: http://goo.gl/QRc11f

Digital Marketing Laws (work in progress…)

Hi,

this is work in progress – I’ll keep updating this list as new moments of “heureka” hit me.

Digital marketing laws

  1. The higher the position in a SERP, the higher the CTR
  2. The more a mixed platform gains demand-side popularity, the more it restricts the organic reach of supply-side
  3. Search-engine traffic consistently outperforms social media traffic in direct ROI
  4. People are not stupid (yes, this is why retargeting is not a stairway to heaven)
  5. “it is almost always much cheaper to retain satisfied customers and turn them into repeat business than it is to attract a new, one-time customer.”

Want to add something? Please post it in the comment section!

Using the VRIN model to evaluate web platforms

Introduction

In this article, I discuss how the classic VRIN model can be used to evaluate modern web platforms.

What is the VRIN model?

It’s one of the most cited models of the resource-based view of the firm. Essentially, it describes how a firm can achieve sustainable competitive advantage through resources that fulfill certain criteria.

These criteria for resources that provide a sustainable competitive advantage are:

  • valuable
  • rare
  • imperfectly imitable
  • non-substitutable

By gaining access to this type of resources, a firm can create a lasting competitive advantage. Note that this framework takes one perspective to strategy, i.e. the resource-based view. Alternative ones are e.g. Porter’s five forces and power-based frameworks, among many others.

The “resource” in resource-based view can be defined as some form of input which can be transformed into tangible or intangible output that provides utility or value in the market. In a competitive setting, a firm competes with its resources against other players; what resources it has and how it uses them are key variables in determining the competitive outcome, i.e. success or failure in the market.

How it applies to web platforms?

In each business environment, there are certain resources that are particularly important. An orange juice factory, for example, requires different resources to be successful than a consulting business (the former needs a good supply of oranges, and the latter bright consultants; both rely on good customer relationships, though).

So, what kind of resources are relevant for online platforms?

I first give a general overview of the VRIN dimensions in online context. This is done by comparing online environment with offline environment.

Value:

The term ‘value’ is tricky because of its definition: if we define it as something useful, we easily end up in a tautology (circular argument): a resource is valuable because it is useful for some party.

  • critical for offline: yes (but which resources?)
  • critical for online: yes (but which resources?)

The specific resources for online platforms are discussed later on.

Rarity:

One of the key preoccupations in economic theory is scarcity: raw materials are scarce and firms need to compete over their exploitation.

  • critical for offline: yes
  • critical for online: no

Offline industries are characterized by rivalry – once oil is consumed, it cannot be reused. Knowledge products on the web, on the other hand, are described as non-rivalry products: if one consumer downloads an MP3 song, that does not remove the ability for another consumer to download as well (but if a consumer buys a snickers bar, there is one less for others to buy). Scarcity is usually associated to startups so that they are forced to innovate due to liability of smallness.

Imitability:

This deals with how well the business idea can be copied.

  • critical for offline: yes
  • critical for online: no

in “traditional” industries, such as manufacturing, patents and copyrights (IPR) are important. They protect firms against infringement and plagiarism. without them, every innovation could be easily copied which would quickly erode any competitive advantage. Intellectual property rights therefore enable the protection of “innovations” against imitation.

Imitation is less of a concern online. In most cases, the web technologies are public knowledge (e.g., open source). Even large players contribute to public domain. Therefore, rather than being something that competitors could not imitate, the emphasis on competition between web platforms tends to be on acquiring users rather than patents. (There are also other sources of resource advantage we’ll discuss later on.)

Substitutability:

The difference between imitation and substitution is that in the former you are being copied whereas in the latter your product is being replaced by another solution. For example, Evernote can be replaced by paper and pen.

  • critical for offline: yes (depends on the case though)
  • not so critical for offline: yes (see the example of Evernote)

However, I would argue the source of resource advantage comes from something else than immunity of subsitution: after all, there are tens of search-engines and hundreds of social networks but still the giants overcome them.

‘Why’ is the question we’re going to examine next.

Important resources for online platforms

Here’s what I think is important:

  1. knowledge
  2. storage/server capacity
  3. users
  4. content
  5. complementors
  6. algorithms
  7. company culture
  8. financing
  9. HQ location

Knowledge means holding the “smartest workers” – this is obviously a highly important resource. As Steve Jobs said, they’re not hiring smart people to tell them what to do, but so that the smart workers could tell Apple what to do.

  • valuable: yes
  • rare: no (comes in abundance)
  • imperfectly imitable: no
  • non-substitutable: yes

Storage/server capacity is crucial for web firms. The more users they have, the more important this resource is in order to provide a reliable user experience.

  • valuable: yes
  • rare: no
  • imperfectly imitable: no
  • non-substitutable: yes

Users are crucial given that the platform condition of critical mass is achieved. Critical mass is closely associated with network effects, meaning that the more there are users, the more valuable the platform is.

  • valuable: yes
  • rare: no
  • imperfectly imitable: no
  • non-substitutable: yes

Content is important as well — content is a complement to content platforms, whereas users are complements of social platforms (for more on this typology, see my dissertation).

  • valuable: yes
  • rare: no
  • imperfectly imitable: no
  • non-substitutable: yes

Complementors are antecedents to getting users or content – they are third parties that provide extensions to the core platform, and therefore add its usefulness to the users.

  • valuable: yes
  • rare: no (depends)
  • imperfectly imitable: yes
  • non-substitutable: no (can be replaced by in-house activities)

Algorithms are proprietary solutions platforms use to solve matching problems.

  • valuable: yes
  • rare: no (depends)
  • imperfectly imitable: no
  • non-substitutable: yes

Company culture is a resource which can be turned into an efficient deployment machine.

  • valuable: yes
  • rare: yes
  • imperfectly imitable: yes
  • non-substitutable: yes

A great company culture may be hard to imitate because its creation requires tacit knowledge.

Financing is an antecedent to acquiring other resources, such as the best team and storage capacity (although it’s not self-evident that money leads to functional a team, as examples in the web industry demonstrate).

  • valuable: yes
  • rare: no (for good businesses)
  • imperfectly imitable: no
  • non-substitutable: no (bootstrapping)

Finally, location is important because can provide an access to a network of partner companies, high-quality employees and investors (think Silicon valley) that, again, are linked to the successful use of other resources.

  • valuable: yes
  • rare: no
  • imperfectly imitable: no
  • non-substitutable: no

A location is not a rare asset because it’s always possible to find an office space in a given city; similarly, you can follow where your competitors go.

Conclusions

What can be learned from this analysis?

First, the “value” in the VRIN framework is self-evident and not very useful in finding out differences between resources, UNLESS the list of resources is really wide and not industry-specific. That would be case when exploring the ; here, the list creation was

My list highlights intangible resources as a source of competitive advantage for web platforms. Based on this analysis, company culture is a resource the most compatible with the VRIN criteria.

Although it was argued that substitutability is less of a concern in online than offline, the risk of disruption touches equally well the dominant web platforms. Their large user base protects them against incremental innovations, but not against disruptive innovations. However, just as the concept of “value” has tautological nature, disruption is the same – disruptive innovation is disruptive because it has disrupted an industry – and this can only be stated in hindsight.

Of course, the best executives in the world have seen disruption beforehand, e.g. Schibstedt and digital transformation of publishing, but most companies, even big ones like Nokia have failed to do so.

How to go deeper

Let’s take a look at the three big: Google, Facebook and eBay. Each one is a platform: Google combines searchers with websites (or, alternatively, advertisers with publisher websites (AdSense); or even more alternatively, advertisers with searchers (AdWords)), Facebook matches users to one another (one-sided platform) and advertisers with users (two-sided platform). eBay as an exchange platform matches buyers and sellers.

It would be useful to assess how well each of them score in the above resources and how the resources are understood in these companies.

I’m into digital marketing, startups, platforms. Download my dissertation on startup dilemmas: http://goo.gl/QRc11f

The difference between business logic and strategy

Introduction

I started thinking this question today when reading my students’ exam answers. The questions was “Define business logic and give an example of it”, and many answers actually defined strategy. At that point, I realized it’s not so easy to see a difference between these two concepts.

So, what would I see as the main difference between strategy and business logic?

What is business strategy?

First, strategy in my opinion involves competition – it’s firm-related decision-making in which we try to gain a competitive advantage, i.e. apply a strategy that helps us win; or, more particularly, to achieve a goal, such as grabbing market share, become profitable, grow, etc. Hence, strategy is closely associated with reaching a pre-defined goal – in company terms, we usually set a vision of where we want to take the company in a certain time-frame (say five years from now), and then create an overall strategy that should take us towards that ideal state. When the firm’s vision is based on some shared principles or values, this is called mission.

As a concept, strategy is much older than business logic and has its roots in military thinking (hence the competitive dimension). For example, Ceaser, Napoleon and Clausewitz are seen as classics of strategy.

What is business logic?

Business logic, then again, would be a description of “why” — why are customers paying us money? It’s much more focused on value / benefit / utility than strategy. I would say business logic is an explanation as to why an organization can remain viable – e.g., it can transform some form of resources (raw material) into output (products). Or, it can be based on exploiting people’s vice (such as the Finnish liquor monopoly Alko) or market inefficiencies, or it can create markets for other players (e.g. Google AdWords).

It seems the two concept involve some overlap – the description of business logic approach strategy when we think how the firm combines resources to produce something customers perceive attractive enough to buy. I’d also say both are applicable to many organizations, not just firms – consider a university, for example. The strategy of a university revolves around ways of attracting the best students and teachers (it’s like a two-sided market), but its business logic is to transform education resources into courses and monetize that either through tuition fees (e.g. US) or state money (e.g. Finland).

As I said to my students, it’s an eye-opening experience when you start seeing either of these concepts “bare” — at that point you truly understand the core of particular choices firms make, and why things are the way they are.

Conclusion

In sum, I’d say strategy is a barebone description of how to compete in a market, whereas business logic is a barebone description of how to make money. If both were games, strategy would be Risk and business logic Monopoly.

What do you think? Please share your thoughts on the topic!

I’m into digital marketing, startups, platforms. Download my dissertation on startup dilemmas: http://goo.gl/QRc11f

How to use Facebook in marketing segmentation?

Introduction

This article discusses the potential of segmentation in Facebook advertising.

Why is segmentation needed?

Segmentation is one of the most fundamental concepts in marketing. Its goal is to identify the best match between the firm’s offering and the market, i.e. find a sub-set of customers who are most likely to buy the product and who therefore can be targeted cost-effectively by means of niche marketing rather than mass marketing.

There are some premises as to why segmentation works:

  • Not all buyers are alike.
  • Sub-groups of people with similar behavior, backgrounds, values and needs can be identified.
  • The sub-groups will be smaller and more homogeneous than the market as a whole.
  • It is easier to satisfy a small group of similar customers than to try to satisfy large groups of dissimilar customers.

(The list if a direct citation from the Essentials of Marketing by Jim Blythe, p. 76.)

While segmentation is about dividing the overall market into smaller pieces (segments), targeting is about selecting the appropriate marketing channels to reach those customer segments. Finally, positioning deals with message formulation in the attempt of positioning the firm and its offerings relative to competitors (e.g., cheaper, better quality). This is the basic marketing model called STP (segmentation, targeting, positioning).

How to apply segmentation in Facebook?

I will next discuss three stages of Facebook campaign creation.

1. Before the campaign

There are a few options for creation of basic segments.

  • generate marketing personas (advantage: makes you assume customer perspective; weakness: vulnerable to marketer’s intuition, i.e. tendency to assume you know your customer whereas in reality you don’t)
  • conduct market research (advantage: suited to your particular case; weakness: costly and takes time)
  • buy consumer research reports (advantage: large sample sizes, comprehensive; weakness: the reports tend to be very general)
  • use Facebook Audience Insights (advantage: specific to Facebook; weakness: gives little behavioral data)

The existence of weaknesses is okay – the whole of point of segmentation is to gather REAL data which is stronger thana priori assumptions.

Based on the insights you’ve gathered, create Saved target groups in Facebook. These incorporate the segments you want to target for. If you are using an ad management tool such as Smartly, you can split audiences into smaller micro-segments e.g. by age, gender and location. Say you have a general segment of Women aged 25-50; you could split it into the following micro-segments by using an interval of five years:

  • women 25-30
  • women 31-36
  • women 37-42
  • women 43-48

The advantage of micro-segments is more granular segmentation; however, the risk is going too granular while ignoring the real-world reason for differences (sometimes the performance difference between two micro-segments is just statistical noise).

After creating the segments in Facebook (reflected in Saved target groups), you want to test how they perform — so as to see how well your assumptions on the effectiveness of these segments are working. For this, create campaigns and let them run. In Power Editor, go to the Custom audiences (select from the sliding menu), select the segments you want to test and choose to create new ad groups. (See, now we have moved from segmentation into targeting, which is the natural step in the STP model.)

NB! If you particularly want to test customer segments, keep everything else (campaign settings, creatives) the same. In Power Editor, this is fairly simple to execute by copy-pasting the creatives between ad groups. This reduces the risk that the performance differences between various segments are a result of some other factor than targeting. Finally, name the ad sets to reflect the segment you are testing (e.g. Women 25-31).

2. During the campaign

After a week or so, go back to check the results. Since you’ve named the segments appropriately, you can quickly see the performance differences between the segments. To make sure the differences are statistically valid (if you are not using a tool such as Smartly), use a calculator to determine the statistical significance. I created one which can be downloaded here.

When interpreting results, remember that the outcome is a combination of segment and message (and that the message is a combination of substance and tone, i.e. what is said and how it is said). In other words,

Result = segment x message, in which message = substance x tone, so that
Result = segment x (substance x tone)

Therefore, as you change the message, it reflects to performance across various segments. This means that you are not actually testing the suitability of your product to the segment (which is what segmentation and targeting is all about), but the match between the message and the target audience. Although this may seem like semantics, it’s actually pretty important. You want to make sure you’re not getting a misleading response from your segment due to issues in message formulation (i.e. talking to them in a “wrong way”), and so you want to make sure it reflects the product as well as possible. Ideally, you’d want to tailor your message based on your ideas of the segment, BUT this is prohibited in the early stage because we want to make sure the message formulation does not interfere with the testing of segment performance.

How to solve this problem, then? Three ways: first, make sure the segments you are testing are not too far apart – i.e. women aged 17 and men aged 45 subjected to the same message can create issues. Second, try to formulate a general message to begin with, so it doesn’t exclude any segments. Third, you could of course make slight modifications to the message while testing the segments — here I would still keep the substance (e.g. cheap price) stable across segments while maybe changing the tone (e.g. type of words used) depending on the audience – for example, older people are usually addressed in a different tone than the younger audience (yo!).

Finally, one extra tip! If you want more granular data on how different groups within your segment have performed, go to Ad reports and check out the data breakdowns. There is a wealth of information there which can be used in creating further micro-segments.

3. After the campaign

What to do when you know which segments are the most profitable? Well, take the results you’ve got and generalize them into your other marketing activities. For example, when you’re buying print ads ask for demographic data they have on readers — it has to be accurate and based on research, not guesses — and choose the media that matches the best performing segments according to your Facebook data. In my opinion, there is no major reason to assume that people in the same segment would act differently in Facebook and elsewhere (strictly speaking, the only potential issue I can think of is that Facebook-people are more “advanced” in their technology use than offline-people, but this is generally a small problem since such a large share of population in most markets are users of Facebook).

There you go – hopefully this article has given you some useful ideas on the relationship between segmentation and Facebook advertising!

I’m into digital marketing, startups, platforms. Download my dissertation on startup dilemmas: http://goo.gl/QRc11f

The Digital Marketing Brief – four things to ask your client

Recently I had an email correspondence with one my brightest digital marketing students. He asked for advice on creating an AdWords campaign plan.

I told him the plan should include certain elements, and only them (it’s easy to make a long and useless plan, and difficult to do it short and useful).

Anyway, in the process I also told him how to make sure he gets the necessary information from the client. These four things I’d like to share with everyone looking for a crystal-clear marketing brief.

They are:

1. campaign goal
2. target group
3. budget
4. duration

First, you want to know the client’s goal. In general, it can direct response (sales) or indirect response (awareness). This affects two things:

  • metrics you include as your KPIs — in other words, will you optimize for impressions, clicks, or conversions.
  • channels you include — if the client wants direct response, search-engine advertising is usually more effective than social media (and vice versa).

The channel selection is the first thing to include into your campaign plan.

Second, you want the client’s understanding of the target group. This affects targeting – in search-engine advertising it’s the keywords you choose; in social media advertising it’s the demographic targeting; in display it’s the managed placements.

Based on this information, you want to make a list (of keywords / placements / demographic types). These targeting elements are the second thing to include into your campaign plan.

Third, the budget matters a great deal. It affects two things:

  • how many channels to choose
  • how to set daily budgets

The bigger the budget is, the more channels can be included in the campaign plan. It’s not always linear, however; e.g. when search volumes are high and the goal is direct response, it makes most sense to spend all on search. But generally, it’s possible to target several stages in customers’ purchase funnel (i.e., stages they go through prior to conversion).

Hence, the budget spend is the third thing to include into your campaign plan.

The daily budget you calculate by dividing the total budget with the number of channels and the duration (in days) of the campaign. At this point, you can allocate the budget in different ways, e.g. search = 2xsocial. It’s important to notice that in social and display you can usually spend as much money as you want, because the available ad inventory is in effect unlimited. But in search the spend is curbed by natural search volumes.

I’m into digital marketing, startups, platforms. Download my dissertation on startup dilemmas: http://goo.gl/QRc11f

The Bounce Problem: How to Track Bounce in Simple Landing Pages

Introduction

This post applies to cases satisfying two conditions.

First, you have a simple landing page designed for immediate action (=no further clicks). This can be the case for many marketing campaigns for which we design a landing page without navigation and a very simple goal, such as learning about a product or watching a video.

Second, you have a high bounce rate, indicating a bad user experience. Bounce rate is calculated as follows:

visitors who leave without clicking further / all visitors

Why does high bounce indicate bad user experience?

It’s a proxy for it. A high bounce rate simply means a lot of people leave the website without clicking further. This usually indicates bad relevance: the user was expecting something else, didn’t find, and so leaves the site immediately.

For search engines a high bounce rate indicates bad landing page relevance vis-à-vis a given search query (keyword), as the user immediately returns to the SERP (search-engine result page). Search engines, such as Google, would like to offer the right solution for a given search query as fast as possible to please their users, and therefore a poor landing page experience may lead to lower ranking for a given website in Google.

The bounce problem

I’ll give a simple example. Say you have a landing page with only one call-to-action, such as viewing a video. You then have a marketing campaign resulting to ten visitors. After viewing the video, all ten users leave the site.

Now, Google Analytics would record this as 100% bounce rate; everyone left without clicking further. Moreover, the duration of the visits would be recorded as 0:00, since the duration is only stored after a user clicks further (which didn’t happen in this case).

So, what should we conclude as site owners when looking at our statistics? 100% bounce: that means either that a) our site sucks or b) the channel we acquired the visitors from sucks. But, in the previous case it’s an incorrect conclusion; all of the users watched the video and so the landing page (and marketing campaign associated with it) was in fact a great success!

How to solve the bounce problem

I will show four solutions to improve your measurement of user experience through bounce rate.

First, simply create an event that pings your analytics software (most typically Google Analytics) when a user makes a desired on-page action (e.g. video viewing). This removes users who completed a desired action but still left without clicking further from the bounce rate calculation.

Here are Google’s instructions for event tracking.

Second, ping GA based on visit duration, e.g. create an event of spending one minute on the page. This will in effect lower your reported bounce rate by degree of users who stay at least a minute on the landing page.

Third, create a form. Filling a form directs the user to another site which then triggers an event for analytics. In most cases, this is also compatible with our condition of a simple landing page with one CTA (well, if you have a video and a form that’s two actions for a user, but in most cases I’d say it’s not too much).

Finally, there is a really cool Analytics plugin by Rob Flaherty called Scrolldepth (thanks Tatu Patronen for the tip!). It pings Google Analytics as users scroll down the page, e.g. by 25%, 75% and 100% intervals. In addition to solving the bounce problem, it also gives you more data on user behavior.

Limitations

Note that adding event tracking to reduce bounce rate only reduces it in your analytics. Search-engines still see bounce as direct exits, and may include that in their evaluation of landing page experience. Moreover, individual solutions have limitations – creation of a form is not always natural given the business, or it may create additional incentive for the user; and Scrolldepth is most useful in lengthy landing pages, which is not always the case.

I’m into digital marketing, startups, platforms. Download my dissertation on startup dilemmas: http://goo.gl/QRc11f

Assessing the scalability of AdWords campaigns

Introduction

Startups, and why not bigger companies, too, often test marketing channels by allocating a small budget to each channel, and then analyzing the results (e.g. CPA, cost per action) per channel.

This is done to determine a) business potential and b) channel potential. The former refers to how lucrative it is to acquire customers given their lifetime value, and the latter to how well each channel performs.

Problem

However, there is one major issue: scaling. It means that when we pour x dollars into the marketing channel in the test phase and get CPA of y dollars, will the CPA remain the same when we increase the budget to x+z dollars (say hundred times more)?

This issue can be tackled by acquiring enough data for statistical significance. This gives us confidence that the results will be similar once the budget is increased.

In AdWords, however, the scaling problem takes another form: the natural limitation of search volumes. By this I mean that at any given time, only a select number of customers are looking for a specific topic. Contrary to Facebook which has de facto an unlimited ad inventory (billions of ad impressions), Google only has a limited (although very large) ad inventory.

Solution

Here’s how to assess the scalability of AdWords campaigns:

1. Go to campaign view
2. Enable column called “Search impression share” (Modify columns –> Competitive metrics)

This will tell you how many searchers saw your ad out of all who could have seen it (this is influenced by your daily budget and bid).

In general, you want impression share to be as high as possible, given that the campaign ROI is positive. So, in general >80% is good, <10% is bad. (The exception is when running a long-tail strategy aiming for low-cost clicks, in which case <10% is okay.)

3. Calculate the scalability as follows:

scalability = clicks / impression share

For example, if you have an impression share of 40 % with which you’ve accumulated 500 clicks, by increasing your budget and bids so that you are able to capture 100% impression share, you will accumulate 1250 clicks (=500/0,40) which is the full potential of this campaign.

Limitations

Note that the formula assumes the CTR remains constant. Additionally, increasing bids may increase your CPA, so improving quality score through better ads and relevance is important to offset this effect.

Startup syndromes: “The Iznogoud Syndrome”

1. Definition

The Iznogoud Syndrome can be defined as follows:

A startup strives to disrupt existing market structures instead of adapting to them.

In most industries, existing relationships are strong, cemented and will not change due to one startup. Therefore, a better strategy is to find ways of providing utility in the existing ecosystem.

2. Origins

The name of this startup syndrome is based on the French comic character who wants to “become Caliph instead of the Caliph“, and continuously fails in that (over-ambitious) attempt. Much similarly, many startups are over-ambitious in their attempt to succeed. In my experience, they have an idealistic worldview while lacking a realistic perspective on the business landscape. While this works for some outliers – for example Steve Jobs – better results can be achieved with a realistic worldview on average. The world is driven by probabilities and hence it’s better to target averages than outliers.

3. Examples

I see them all the time. Most startups I advise in startup courses and events aim at disintermediation: they want to remove vendors from the market and replace them. For example, a startup wanted to remove recruiting agencies by making their own recruiting platform. Since recruiting agencies already have the customer relationships, it’s an unrealistic scenario. What upset me was that the team didn’t even consider providing value to the recruiting agencies, but intuitively saw them as junk to be replaced.

Another example: there is a local dominant service providing information on dance events, which holds something like 90% of market (everyone uses it). Yet, it has major usability issues. Instead of partnering with the current market leader to fix their problems, the startup wants to create its competing platform from scratch and then “steal” all users. That’s an unrealistic scenario. All around, there is too much emphasis put on disintermediation and seeing current market operators either as waste or competitors as oppose to potential partners in user acquisition, distribution or whatever.

Startups should realize they are not alone in the market, but the market has been there for a hundred years. They cannot just show up and say “hey, I’m going to change how you’ve done business for 100 years.” Or they can, but they will most likely fail. This is all well for the industry in which it doesn’t matter if 9 out of 10 fail, as the one winning brings the profits, but for an individual startup it makes more sense to get the odds of success (even average one) greater. So you see, what is good for the startup industry in general is not the same as what is good for your startup in particular.

4. Similarity to other startup syndromes

The Iznogoud syndrome is similar to “Market education syndrome”, according to which an innovation created by the startup falls short in consumer adoption regardless of its technical quality – many VC’s avoid products requiring considerable market education costs. Whereas the Market education syndrome can be seen a particular issue in B2C markets, the Iznogoud syndrome is more acute in B2B markets.

5. Recommendations

Simply put, startups should learn more about their customers or clients. They need to understand their business logic (B2B) or daily routines (B2C) and how value can be provided there. In B2B markets, there are generally two ways to provide value for clients:

  • help them sell more
  • help them cut costs

If you do so, potential clients are more likely to listen. As stated previously, this is a more realistic scenario in doing business than thinking ways of replacing them.

I’m into digital marketing, startups, platforms. Download my dissertation on startup dilemmas: http://goo.gl/QRc11f