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Affinity analysis in political social media marketing – the missing link

Introduction. Hm… I’ve figured out how to execute successful political marketing campaign on social media [1], but one link is missing still. Namely, applying affinity analysis (cf. market basket analysis).

Discounting conversions. Now, you are supposed to measure “conversions” by some proxy – e.g., time spent on site, number of pages visited, email subscription. Determining which measurable action is the best proxy for likelihood of voting is a crucial sub-problem, which you can approach with several tactics. For example, you can use the closest action to final conversion (vote), i.e. micro-conversion. This requires you have an understanding of the sequence of actions leading to final conversion. You could also use a relative cut-off point; e.g. the nth percentile with the highest degree of engagement is considered as converted.

Anyhow, this is very important because once you have secured a vote, you don’t want to waste your marketing budget by showing ads to people who already have decided to vote for your candidate. Otherwise, you risk “preaching to the choir”. Instead, you want to convert as many uncertain voters to voters as possible, by using different persuasion tactics.

Affinity analysis. The affinity analysis can be used to accomplish this. In ecommerce, you would use it as a basis for recommendation engine for cross-selling or up-selling (“customers who bought this item also bought…” à la Amazon). First you detemine which sets of products are most popular, and then show those combinations to buyers interested in any item belonging to that set.

In political marketing, affinity analysis means that because a voter is interested in topic A, he’s also interested in topic B. Therefore, we will show him information on topic B, given our extant knowledge his interests, in order to increase likelihood of conversion. This is a form of associative

Operationalization. But operationalizing this is where I’m still in doubt. One solution could be building an association matrix based on website behavior, and then form corresponding retargeting audiences (e.g., website custom audiences on Facebook). The following picture illustrates the idea.

Figure 1 Example of affinity analysis (1=Visited page, 0=Did not visit page)

For example, we can see that themes C&D and A&F commonly occur together, i.e. people visit those sub-pages in the campaign site. You can validate this by calculating correlations between all pairs. When you set your data in binary format (0/1), you can use Pearson correlation for the calculations.

Facebook targeting. Knowing this information, we can build target audiences on Facebook, e.g. “Visited /Theme_A; NOT /Theme_F; NOT /confirmation”, where confirmation indicates conversion. Then, we would show ads on Theme F to that particular audience. In practice, we could facilitate the process by first identifying the most popular themes, and then finding the associated themes. Once the user has been exposed to a given theme, and did not convert, he needs to be exposed to another theme (with the highest association score). The process is continued until themes run out, or the user converts, which ever comes first. Applying the earlier logic of determining proxy for conversion, visiting all theme sub-pages can also be used as a measure for conversion.

Finally, it is possible to use more advanced methods of associative learning. That is, we could determine that {Theme A, Theme F} => {Theme C}, so that themes A and B predict interest in theme C. However, it is more appropriate to predict conversion rather than interest in other themes, because ultimately we’re interested in persuading more voters.

Footnotes

[1] Posts in Finnish:

https://www.facebook.com/joni.salminen.33/posts/10212240031455606

https://www.facebook.com/joni.salminen.33/posts/10212237230465583

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