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A major change in AdWords – How to react?

Introduction

Google has made a major change in AdWords. Ads are now shown only in the main column, no longer in the right column. Previously, there were generally speaking eight ads per SERP. For some queries, Google didn’t show ads at all, and additionally they’ve been constantly testing the limit, e.g. running up to 16 product listing ads per results page.

But what does that mean to an advertiser?

Analysis

The change means the number of ads shown per SERP (search-engine results page) is effectively reduced. Since the number of advertisers is not reduced (unless rotation is applied, see below), the competition intensifies. And since the visibility of search ads is based on cost-per-click auction, ceteris paribus the click prices will go up.

Therefore, logical conclusion is that when ad placements are cut, either CPC increases (due to higher competition) or impression share decreases (due to rotation). In the former, you pay more for the same number of visitors, in the latter you pay the same click price but get less visitors.

Why Google might in fact prefer ad rotation, i.e. curbing down an individual advertiser’s impression share (the number of times your ads is shown out of all possible times it could have been shown) is because that wouldn’t impact their return-on-ad-spend (ROAS) which is a relative metric. However, it would affect the absolute volume of clicks and, consequently, sales.

In some of my campaigns, I’m using a longtail positioning strategy where this will influence, since these campaigns are targeting positions 4+ which, as said, are mostly no longer available. Most likely, the change will completely eradicate the possibility of running those campaigns with my low CPC-goal.

Why did Google do this?

For Google, this is a beneficial and logical change since right column ads are commanding lower CTRs (click-through rates). This has two implications – first, they bring less money for Google since its revenue is directly associated with the number of clicks; second, as commonly known Google is using CTR as a proxy for user experience (for example, it’s a major component in Quality Score calculations which determine the true click price).

Therefore, removing the possibility of poorly performing ads while pushing the advertisers to an increased competition is a beneficial situation for Google. In the wider picture, even with higher click prices, the ROI of Google ads is not easily challenged by any other medium or channel, at least what I can see taking place in the near future.

However, for advertisers it may easily signify higher click prices and therefore decreasing returns of search advertising. This conflict of interest is unfortunate one for advertisers, especially given the skewed distribution of power in their relationship to Google.

(On a side-note, the relationship between advertisers and Google is extremely interesting. I studied that to some extent in my Master’s thesis back in 2009. You can find it here: https://www.dropbox.com/s/syaetj8m1k66oxr/10223.pdf?dl=0)

Conclusion

I recommend you revise the impact of this change on your accounts, either internally or if you’re using an agency, with them.

Dr. Joni Salminen holds a PhD in marketing from the Turku School of Economics. His research interests relate to startups, platforms, and digital marketing.

Contact email: [email protected]

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